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Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.

                                                                                                                              Confucius



 

Confucius (551–479 BC) was a Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher  of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history.



For many people today, a career for life is no longer an option. Most people will hold jobs with a variety of employers and move across different employment sectors through their working life.

We all need to be flexible in our working patterns and be prepared to change jobs and/or sectors if we believe there are better opportunities elsewhere. 

In order to be flexible we need a set of "transferable skills"  – skills that are not specific to one particular career path but are generic across all employment sectors.

Employability has been defined as "the capability of getting and keeping satisfactory work".

 

Other factors that help to make people employable include:

  • knowledge and abilities relating to a particular job,
  • the ability to identify suitable job opportunities;
  • self-presentation (on applications and at interviews) 
  • external factors such as the job market and personal circumstances.
Employers look for a range of skills in job applicants, many of which are common to a number of different career areas. Those most frequently mentioned are communication,  teamworking, leadership, initiative, problem-solving,  flexibility and enthusiam.

You may also see these skills referred to as transferable skills (because skills developed in one area of your life can be transferred to other areas) or personal skills. In the context of your career planning and development, they are called career management skills.

With the job market tougher than it's ever been, we feel it is our duty to give you an edge when stepping out into the big wide world.


Take control of your career -

Are you afraid of getting it wrong at work?

The fear of getting it wrong, or "FOGIW", is a growing social anxiety now affectiong our careers and work lives.  John Lees, careers coach and author of 'How to Get a Job you Love, believes while it is natural to worry about whether we're making the right decisions in our career, FOGIW is increasingly road-blocking our choices and crushing our confidence. 

  • You've been offered a job but don't believe your're up to it.  Soluction: If the organisation likes you enough to offer you the job, you've probaly got what it takes.
  • Believing you're a fake.  Soluation: Recongise where this is hloding you back and find support from a mentor, or positive friends who can remind you of what you have genuinely achieved and also point you towards new chanllenges.
  • Worry that if you change careers you won't like it.  Solution: If you're really intrested in a new career, talk to people in that field about the work they do; discover the pros and cons and what you will be doing most of the time. 
  • You've been with an employer for five years and fear moving anywhere lese.  Solucation: If you're feeling stuck in a rut and haven't progressed or enjoyed new experiences it's time to take on new responsibilities or think about moving on to refresh your CV.
  • You don't want to ask for a pay rise or promotion in case it boucnces badly.  Soluation: Firm negotiation skills are often what your employer expects you to take to the marketplace, so why not use them for yourself?
  • Worrying about job interviews.  Solution:  Look hard at the top six items on an employer's shopping list and prepare matching evidence from your experience.  Rehares short, punchy narratives to talk about your skills to feel more prepared and you will also boost your confidence.
  • Kowning you need to network but worry about how you come across?  Solution:  First practise networking coversations with people who are easy to approach.  Ask more questions than you answer.  Just talk about what you find excitiong and interesting.
  • Needing to have a shop window on social media, but worry that your will look lame.  Solution:  A linkdin page provises and easy-access CV to anyone interested in talking to you.  Make sure the first 100 words or so describe what you do and what your're best at.
  • Wanting to be promoted, but worry about the extra responsibility.  Solution:  Again, this should be based on onjective facts rather than your guesswork.  Look at what senior pople in your organisation actully do- how will that overall balace suit your?
  • Itchin to do your own thing, but worry it will bankrupt you.  Solution:  Think through how you would cope with creating business as well as running it But look, too, at the rewards including flexibility and getting a sound financial return on the time you put into projects.

 

 

 
The skills employers are looking for -

Anyone moving between sectors, employers or even jobs, needs to forcus on what they can bring to the role, rather than what they can't.  When highlighting these skills, always give examples of how you can demonstrate them.  For example, instead of saying "good at management" describe who, what and how you manage, such as: "I manage a team of 20 people and last year we achieved all of our targets."

Transferable skills include IT and computing, good communication skills, problem-solving, team-working, organising, management and leadership, negotiating, motivating people and decision-making.


CV’s 

 

 

The most common mistake when creating a CV is to prepare a standard CV and then send it to all recruiters and for all types of job without amending it to suit the particular job or recruiter.

 

This can be problematic because you risk your CV looking impersonal and standardised. It could also lead to you not presenting your learning, skills and interests in a targeted way.

 

 What is a CV?


CV stands for curriculum vitae, which means a brief account of your career. CVs are used to explain to recruiters what you can do and what you have done, so a good CV looks forwards as well as accounts for what you did in the past. 

 What should you include in a CV?

 

A CV needs to include enough information for the recruiter to decide whether you are likely to be a suitable candidate, so you should include: 

  • contact details - name, address, mobile phone number, email address;
  • knowledge - educational or professional qualifications, dates of institutions attended;
  • skills and competencies - ability to work in a team, manage customers, specific IT skills, level of responsibility;
  • work-related experiences - periods of paid or unpaid work, previous employers, job titles, examples of tasks;
  • referees - two people who can comment on your paid or unpaid work.

 

  

CV types -

Traditional CV  

The traditional CV, sometimes known as a chronological CV is used to match your qualifications and work experience with the requirements for the job role. The CV is structured in reverse chronological order i.e. the most recent qualifications and experience are listed first.

Skills-based CV

The skills-based CV, also known as a functional CV, can be used if you have gaps in your employment history. This type of CV is also useful if you have limited experience or you are applying for a job which is not related to your degree subject

Academic CV

Academic CVs are focused on your academic achievements and are used when applying for lecturing or research-based roles, including post-doctoral research. Although there is no page limit, it's important to keep your CV concise and targeted to the requirements of the role.



Sample CV - 

 

 

 

Your Name
Contact Details (With Town & County)
Telephone numbers including Mobile contact details & E-mail address

 

 

 

PROFILE

This is your opportunity to present your unique skill set and the value you bring to a new organisation. You need to ensure that you present a compelling, hard-hitting summary paragraph.  This is the most important part of your CV. It gets read the most and sets the tone for the rest of the document.  This section should include a brief history of your career, it should include details of the sectors you worked in, and it should also include some of the skills you have used in your career to date.  This section should never be in bullet point format and should be no more thank 8 to 10 sentences long.

 

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS 

  • This section should include a list of 4-8 achievements using the STAR method and should be presented in bullet point format. 
  • You should include details of a situation you were involved in that resulted in a positive outcome for your employer.  You should describe the tasks involved in that situation, talk about the various actions taken and the results relating to the actions taken.    

 

·        Employers want to know that you have solved problems similar to theirs and that you achieved the results for which they are looking.

·        Example: Rationalised resourcing costs by £xxx and maintained customer satisfaction scores of 99%.

 

EMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE 

Remember you should start with your most recent employment first and work backwards.  Your job descriptions should start out strong and sustain interest by emphasising key skills.  Job descriptions should start with active verbs and written so that the first sentence conveys keywords that are relevant to prospective employers.      

 

 

Title Held, Name of Company                                                                  Dates of employment  

 

·        Insert further details of your key duties and responsibilities.  Remember to use active verbs including sold, solved performed etc.. 

·        Insert further details of your key duties and responsibilities.  Remember to use active verbs including sold, solved etc.

·        Insert further details of your key duties and responsibilities.  Remember to use active verbs including sold, solved etc..

 

EDUCATION & TRAINING 

List any qualifications gained

University Name, dates (if applicable) 

List any qualifications gained 

College Name dates (if applicable)

List qualifications gained (do not include GCSE results if you have a Degree qualification)

 

School Name: dates (if applicable) 

 

Employers will always review the education section.   Include details of the qualifications and training you do have.  If you are concerned about your lack of qualifications don't worry, many highly regarded business professionals do not have academic qualifications.   Employers generally value experience over education.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS 

Insert details of memberships

Example: Member of the Institute of Chartered Surveyors since 2010

 

 

INTERESTS 

Include brief details of interests if you have the space on your document however avoid phrases including 'socialising', 'partying' etc..

 

References available on request

The skills employers are looking for -

Anyone moving between sectors, employers or even jobs, needs to forcus on what they can bring to the role, rather than what they can't.  When highlighting these skills, always give examples of how you can demonstrate them.  For example, instead of saying "good at management" describe who, what and how you manage, such as: "I manage a team of 20 people and last year we achieved all of our targets."

Transferable skills include IT and computing, good communication skills, problem-solving, team-working, organising, management and leadership, negotiating, motivating people and decision-making.


 

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